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March 2016

Empowering Performance #NSTA16

NSTA’s National Conference on Science Education features 150 STEM focused sessions that will provide administrators and teachers exciting new ways to introduce and engage their students in STEM.


If you'll be at NSTA, please visit us at Booth #1334. If you would like to attend one of our presentations, register below today!


If you’re not going to Nashville, there are many ways you can keep up with the latest developments on how you can teach STEM in your classroom, in whatever town or state you may teach.

To stay current with the latest trends on how to be a better science teacher click here



The NYC Elementary Schools Principal Conference is designed to recognize, celebrate, and share promising practices across New York City Department of Education schools.

How To Get Started With Your A+ STEM Lab


A lot of teachers ask me what is a good way to get started once I have my A+ STEM Lab.

The first experiment I recommend to elementary teachers is "Are your hands warmer than mine?"

It’s a great way to introduce the students to their first probe - the temperature sensor. It will also teach them how to use the data logger and graphing software.

Plus, the students will have fun trying to raise the temperature by rubbing their hands together. They´ll make it into a fun game while learning all the different components.

For more information to get started with your A+ STEM Lab, please contact David Dickman, Instructional Technology Specialist.

Join a fun hands-on science lesson at St. Patrick's School in Huntington, NY. Students learn a variety of ways to use microscopes with the help of STEM Lab equipment from A+ STEM Labs!

See The A+ STEM Lab At:


 

Click here to let us know what was your favorite experiment while using the A+ STEM Lab!

 

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Economic and sociologic changes have dramatically impacted the work place, creating a demand for more qualified workers. The U.S. educational system is not producing enough engineers and scientists to meet the challenges..
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